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Mitchell’s laws:
●Those, who do not understand the differences between Monetary Sovereignty and monetary non-sovereignty, do not understand economics.
●The more federal budgets are cut and taxes increased, the weaker an economy becomes. .
Liberals think the purpose of government is to protect the poor and powerless from the rich and powerful. Conservatives think the purpose of government is to protect the rich and powerful from the poor and powerless.
●Austerity is the government’s method for widening
the gap between rich and poor.
●Until the 99% understand the need for federal deficits, the upper 1% will rule.
To survive long term, a monetarily non-sovereign government must have a positive balance of payments.
●Everything in economics devolves to motive,
and the motive is the Gap.
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Here is all you need to know about the crime of torturing prisoners:

It wasn’t all that bad. And it worked to get valuable information.

And, we never knew what the CIA was doing. And anyway, it never happened, because as President Bush and Vice President Cheney said, “We don’t torture.”

Also, doing the crime is not bad for America, but revealing the crime is bad for America. Criminals are good people, but tattle-tales put America in danger.

Finally, these revelations will get Islamists angry at us, because up ’til now, they have not been angry at us. Right?

Let’s begin with the idol of the GOP, Ronald Reagan:

Ronald Reagan: Message to the Senate Transmitting the Convention Against Torture and Inhuman Treatment or Punishment, May 20, 1988

I transmit herewith the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

The Convention was adopted by unanimous agreement of the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1984, and entered into force on June 26, 1987. The United States signed it on April 18, 1988.

The United States participated actively and effectively in the negotiation of the Convention. It marks a significant step in the development during this century of international measures against torture and other inhuman treatment or punishment.

Ratification of the Convention by the United States will clearly express United States opposition to torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately still prevalent in the world today.

That was then. This is now.

Cheney: We waterboarded U.S. soldiers, so it’s not torture
SEPTEMBER 9, 2011facebooktwittergoogle-plusredditemail

Cheney: “We waterboarded U.S. soldiers, so it’s not torture.”

Former Vice President Dick Cheney argued on Friday morning that the waterboarding of terror suspects did not amount to torture because the same techniques had been used on U.S. soldiers during training.

“The techniques that we used were all previously used on Americans. “All of them were used in training for a lot of our own specialists in the military. So there wasn’t any technique that we used on any al Qaeda individual that hadn’t been used on our own troops first, just to give you some idea whether or not we were ‘torturing’ the people we captured.”

(Of course) the troops in training are not subjected to the practice 183 times. Also, the soldiers presumably know their training will end, and they won’t be allowed to actually drown or left to rot in some dark, anonymous prison.

Hey, what’s a little waterboarding? The Vice President says it’s not torture, even though “The report’s central conclusion is that harsh interrogation measures, deemed torture by program critics, didn’t work.”.

Some in Cheney’s party, including Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), believe that waterboarding is torture. Malcolm Nance, a counterterrorism consultant for the U.S. government and a former SERE instructor, has argued repeatedly that waterboarding is torture and called for prohibiting its use on prisoners.

“Waterboarding is slow motion suffocation with enough time to contemplate the inevitability of black out and expiration — usually the person goes into hysterics on the board. For the uninitiated, it is horrifying to watch and if it goes wrong, it can lead straight to terminal hypoxia. When done right it is controlled death. Its lack of physical scarring allows the victim to recover and be threaten[ed] with its use again and again.”

O.K., so Cheney is a conservative beast, who probably would torture his own mother for sport, but wasn’t Congress kept in the dark?

Cheney said the George W. Bush administration had received approval for the “enhanced interrogation program” from all nine congressional leaders who had been briefed on its details: this included the leaders of both intelligence committees, the leaders of both parties, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Oh? Well . . . uh . . . see, it’s like this. The fact that it’s a crime against humanity, for which we should be prosecuted, means nothing. It’s the revealing of the crime that really is a crime.

Sun Sentinel: “GOP greets report with harsh questions of motive.” 12/10/14

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said America’s intelligence community deserves “our thanks, not an ideologically motivated report designed to underpin their work.”

Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky, the incoing majority leader, dismissed the extensive probe as a parisan “study” done at the behest of Democrats for political advantage. “It doesn’t tell us much that we didn’t probably already know anyway, but significantly endangers Americans around the world. The release serves no purpose whatsoever.”

Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C. called the conclusions of the report, “a fiction.”

So, as we said, revealing the crime is a crime and anyway, the crime didn’t happen.

At least, the President under which this crime (that didn’t happen,) is shocked — or maybe not.

George W. Bush: Described CIA employees as “patriots” and questioned the report’s legitimacy. “If it diminishes their contribution to our country, it is way off base. I knew a lot of the operators. These are good people, really good people and we’re lucky as a nation to have them.”

Cheney believed the findings would be “all a bunch of hooey. As far as I’m concerned, they ought to be decorated, not criticized.”

Yes, the CIA are “patriots,” whose heroics we dare not speak of, because they are so shameful and criminal.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla, a member of the intelligence committee who was one of just three Republicans voting against declassifying the report, said Democrats advanced it only for the “partisan joy their going get from trying to embarrass people in the Bush administration.”

Asked if he could defend the kinds of abuses in the report, Rubio demurred:

“I’m not going to criticize anyone who did their job in trying to acquire information that would protect American lives and prevent terrorist attacks.

“Protect American lives and prevent terrorist attacks?” Uh, not really.

As President, Rubio says he would support torture of prisoners. That is his level of morality.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky: “It’s important to say we’re not going to do that (torture). Whether or not you have to go into all the gory details, whether that’s good for the country, maybe not.”

Yes, it’s important to SAY we’re not going to torture, but doing the torture is O.K., so long as we don’t talk about it.

Some detainees were forced to stay awake for a week, usually standing or in stress positions, at times with their hands shackled above their heads.

Some were doused with ice water or stripped naked and chained for days in unheated, unlit cells.

At least five captives were subjected to painful rectal rehydration or unnecessary rectal feeding.

The most gruesome conditions occurred at a former brick factory north of Kabul, Afghanistan. The “Salt Pit” was so dungeon-like that interrogators wore headlamps to navigate its dark passageways.

Detainees were walked around naked or were shackled with their hands above their heads for extended periods of time. (They) were hooded and dragged up and down a long corridor while being punched and slapped.

An Afghan militant named Gul Rahman died in the Salt Pit of suspected hypothermia after he was stripped naked from the waist down and chained to a concrete floor in near-freezing temperatures.

All this was done in the name of America, by American “patriots” (to use President Bush’s and Vice-President Cheney’s description). Supposedly this was done to get valuable information, although the data show that torture doesn’t work.

Does America have a moral compass, or are we no different from the viscous terrorists for whom we have contempt?

We have the most powerful military the world ever has known. Yet, does our fear remain so great, and have we sunk so low as a nation, that we are willing to elect “patriots” who are as bad as our enemies? Are we a people who happily would be led by a Hitler or an Idi Amin?

Another election is coming. This is a good time for you and me to face the mirror of history, and decide: Who am I? What is my morality? How low will I sink? Am I proud to be an American?

Do the barbarians speak for me?

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell
Monetary Sovereignty

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Ten Steps to Prosperity:
1. Eliminate FICA (Click here)
2. Federally funded Medicare — parts A, B & D plus long term nursing care — for everyone (Click here)
3. Provide an Economic Bonus to every man, woman and child in America, and/or every state a per capita Economic Bonus. (Click here) Or institute a reverse income tax.
4. Free education (including post-grad) for everyone. Click here
5. Salary for attending school (Click here)
6. Eliminate corporate taxes (Click here)
7. Increase the standard income tax deduction annually. (Refer to this.)
8. Tax the very rich (.1%) more, with higher, progressive tax rates on all forms of income. (Click here)
9. Federal ownership of all banks (Click here and here)

10. Increase federal spending on the myriad initiatives that benefit America’s 99% (Click here)

The Ten Steps will add dollars to the economy, stimulate the economy, and narrow the income/wealth/power Gap between the rich and the rest.
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10 Steps to Economic Misery: (Click here:)
1. Maintain or increase the FICA tax..
2. Spread the myth Social Security, Medicare and the U.S. government are insolvent.
3. Cut federal employment in the military, post office, other federal agencies.
4. Broaden the income tax base so more lower income people will pay.
5. Cut financial assistance to the states.
6. Spread the myth federal taxes pay for federal spending.
7. Allow banks to trade for their own accounts; save them when their investments go sour.
8. Never prosecute any banker for criminal activity.
9. Nominate arch conservatives to the Supreme Court.
10. Reduce the federal deficit and debt

No nation can tax itself into prosperity, nor grow without money growth. Monetary Sovereignty: Cutting federal deficits to grow the economy is like applying leeches to cure anemia.
1. A growing economy requires a growing supply of dollars (GDP=Federal Spending + Non-federal Spending + Net Exports)
2. All deficit spending grows the supply of dollars
3. The limit to federal deficit spending is an inflation that cannot be cured with interest rate control.
4. The limit to non-federal deficit spending is the ability to borrow.

THE RECESSION CLOCK
Monetary Sovereignty

Monetary Sovereignty

Vertical gray bars mark recessions.

As the federal deficit growth lines drop, we approach recession, which will be cured only when the growth lines rise. Increasing federal deficit growth (aka “stimulus”) is necessary for long-term economic growth.

#MONETARYSOVEREIGNTY