Questions for the Supreme Court — and for you.

“The President, Vice President and civil officers of the United States shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” — Article II, section 4, U.S. Constitution

“Judgment in cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office … but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to law.” — Article I, section 9, U.S. Constitution

Some say a sitting President cannot be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed for any crime.

Although this is not unambiguously addressed in the Constitution, current circumstances (a possibly criminal President) may require the Supreme Court to answer questions such a the following:

  1. Are there any crimes for which a sitting President cannot be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed, while he is President?
  2. Are there any crimes for which a sitting President can be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed, while he is President? (If, for instance, President Donald Trump were to arrange for the murder of Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama, could he be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed?)
  3. Are civil actions treated differently from criminal actions?
  4. If, a Presidential candidate arranges for the murder of his opponent, and subsequently is elected President, can he be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed during his term of Presidency?
  5. If a sitting President is found to have committed treason before being elected, can he be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed?
  6. If, at a sitting President’s direction, someone is found to have committed any crime, including murder, treason, or obstruction of justice, can the President pardon that person?
  7. If either before or during his Presidency, the President commits a crime, how will the Statute of Limitations be handled (if he can’t be prosecuted, convicted, sentenced, and jailed, while he is President)?
  8. Does the Constitution require the political process called “impeachment” to precede any legal process?
  9. Are the above answers different for Presidents vs. any other federal employees, including Vice-Presidents, Congressmen, et al.
  10. Do the above answers differ for federal prosecutions vs. state/local government prosecutions?

These questions are discussed at How the President Can Be Prosecuted as a Criminal  and Can We Indict a Sitting President?

Interesting, isn’t it, that these questions have such immediate relevance?

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell
Monetary Sovereignty
Twitter: @rodgermitchell; Search #monetarysovereignty
Facebook: Rodger Malcolm Mitchell

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The single most important problems in economics involve the excessive income/wealth/power Gaps between the have-mores and the have-less.

Wide Gaps negatively affect poverty, health and longevity, education, housing, law and crime, war, leadership, ownership, bigotry, supply and demand, taxation, GDP, international relations, scientific advancement, the environment, human motivation and well-being, and virtually every other issue in economics.

Implementation of The Ten Steps To Prosperity can narrow the Gaps:

Ten Steps To Prosperity:
1. Eliminate FICA

2. Federally funded medicare — parts a, b & d, plus long-term care — for everyone

3. Provide a monthly economic bonus to every man, woman and child in America (similar to social security for all)

4. Free education (including post-grad) for everyone

5. Salary for attending school

6. Eliminate federal taxes on business

7. Increase the standard income tax deduction, annually. 

8. Tax the very rich (the “.1%) more, with higher progressive tax rates on all forms of income.

9. Federal ownership of all banks

10. Increase federal spending on the myriad initiatives that benefit America’s 99.9% 

The Ten Steps will grow the economy, and narrow the income/wealth/power Gap between the rich and you.

MONETARY SOVEREIGNTY

3 thoughts on “Questions for the Supreme Court — and for you.

  1. Good questions all! My response to all of them would be “dammed if I know! Of course, I’m not a constitutional expert. I did take a con law course in college so I know about things like Marbury v Madison, Plessy v Ferguson, & Brown v the Board of Education, etc. It doesn’t go much beyond that, however.

    I do think that, under our current circumstances, we desperately need answers to those questions. We’re definitely going to need them, and soon! ________________________________

    Like

  2. So much for the beauty of the U.S. Costitution. Time for some more amendments.
    Personally I like the way the British do it. As soon people feel it’s time to throw the bum out then have a special election.

    Like

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