11 experts try to trick you about the U.S. economy Wednesday, Aug 5 2020 

Uncle Sam broke.png

100% impossible.

The following will give you a treasured opportunity to read the words of 11 experts, each demonstrating his lack of knowledge or lack of honesty about federal finances and economics.

Their hope or effect is to make you ignorant about the economy, during this time of crisis.

If your hope is to become ignorant about federal finances or economic, then do believe what they say. You will be able to cross that item off your bucket list.

But if you wish to understand the facts, and perhaps even be able to contact your political leaders with the facts, read on.

As you read, please remember that federal finances are nothing at all like your personal finances, nothing like business finances, and nothing like state/local government finances.

The federal government uniquely is Monetarily Sovereign. It never, NEVER can run short of its own sovereign currency, the U.S. dollar.

And the government, being sovereign over the dollar, has absolute control over its value.

When it comes to the U.S. dollar, the federal government is God. So don’t use your own personal financial experience as a template about federal finances.

Here are excerpts from an article written by Mike Bebernes, of Yahoo News, followed by my comments.

Coronavirus aid: Is the U.S. taking on too much debt?
Mike Bebernes, Editor,Yahoo News 360•August 4, 2020

Negotiations in Congress about the next stimulus bill aimed at countering the economic effect of the coronavirus have ground to a crawl amid debate over how big the rescue package should be.

Not only is there the expected sparring between Democrats and Republicans, the issue is also reportedly causing a rift within the GOP itself.

A vocal group of Republicans have begun to raise concerns about adding how much the next stimulus will add to the federal deficit, “We have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt,” Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said some of his GOP colleagues are “no different than socialist Democrats when it comes to debt.”

Right off the bat, you see Mnuchin’s ignorance. The economic effect of the coronavirus is quite simple: Businesses are running short of paying customers and people are running short of income with which to pay businesses.

The effect is that businesses and people are running short of money. This lack of money causes a recession.

The solution to a recession also is quite simple: Give businesses and people money.

As for Rand Paul’s concern, deficit spending is not “socialist.” Socialism is government ownership and control of businesses. Handing out money and/or providing benefits (healthcare, education, etc.) is not socialism.

Fakers love to toss around the word “socialist,” because they know Americans will react negatively to it. Any time you hear someone accuse some federal spending as “socialist,” know you are being conned.

House Democrats passed a $3.4 trillion stimulus bill in May. The proposal under consideration by Senate Republicans carries a $1.1 trillion price tag.

Even if a significantly smaller package ends up being passed, the national debt will still be at historic levels.

The $2.2 trillion CARES Act passed in March pushed the deficit over $26 trillion and has the country on pace for the largest annual ratio of debt as a share of the economy since World War II.

Although it commonly is termed, “debt,” it isn’t the same thing as personal debt or business debt. That thing called “debt” actually is the total of deposits into Treasury Security accounts (T-Bills, T-Notes, T-Bonds) held at the Federal Reserve (The Fed).

These deposits are not a burden on anyone — not on the government, not on taxpayers, and not on future generations. If the government wished, it could pay off the deposits today, merely by returning the dollars currently residing in those T-Security accounts.

If you own a T-bill, and that T-bill matures, the government will send back to you your dollars that reside in your T-bill account.

It would just be a transfer of your dollars similar to a transfer from your savings account to your checking account.

No tax dollars involved in the repayment of federal “debt.”.

The coronavirus isn’t the only reason the U.S. has so much debt. After running a surplus in the late 1990s, the deficit has ballooned over the past two decades.

Despite promising to eliminate the federal debt — which stood at $19 trillion when he took office — President Trump is on pace to have the largest deficit of any president.

The virus is taking dollars from the private sector, which has caused a recession.

Eliminating the so-called “debt” (deposits into T-Security Accounts) would take even more dollars from the economy, causing the deepest depression in U.S. history (and world history).

For example:

1804-1812: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 48%. Depression began 1807.
1817-1821: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 29%. Depression began 1819.
1823-1836: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 99%. Depression began 1837.
1852-1857: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 59%. Depression began 1857.
1867-1873: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 27%. Depression began 1873.
1880-1893: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 57%. Depression began 1893.
1920-1930: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 36%. Depression began 1929.
1997-2001: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 15%. Recession began 2001.

You can thank your god that Trump didn’t live up to his promise, for had he somehow managed to eliminate U.S. debt, you would be living naked in a cave, eating cave bats.

To many fiscal conservatives, large deficits pose a major risk to the economic stability of the country.

Taking on debt may be a quick way to solve problems in the short term, but it only pushes the burden onto future generations, they argue.

The weight of trillions of dollars in debt, plus the interest accrued, will stifle the country’s ability to recover from the recession and hinder growth once the economy improves.

Federal deficit spending adds growth dollars to the economy, which is exactly why they “solve problems in the short term.” Deficit spending also solves problems in the mid-term and the long term.

Think of all the things for which the federal government spends money. Then ask yourself, “Which of these, if eliminated, would grow the economy?”

Being Monetarily Sovereign, the federal government creates new dollars by spending. That is the government’s method of dollar-creation.

To pay a creditor, the federal government sends instructions (not dollars) to the creditor’s bank, instructing the bank to increase the balance in the creditor’s checking account.

The instant the creditor’s bank does as instructed, new dollars are created and added to the nation’s M1 money supply.

Deficit spending is no burden whatsoever on future generations. In fact, federal deficit spending benefits future generations by providing them not only with dollars, but also with roads, bridges, health care, education, military protection, safe food, legal protections, and the myriad other things the government pays for.

As for “interest accrued,” those dollars go into the private sector, stimulating economic growth. Interest is no burden on the federal government, which being Monetarily Sovereign has infinite dollars.

(That is why there is no way to answer the question, “How much money does the federal government have?” The real answer is, “Infinite.”)

America’s ability to keep borrowing enormous amounts of money, at least in theory, could run out if oversized deficits reduce confidence in the U.S. economy.

If that happens sometime in the future, it could cause a major spike in interest rates, severe inflation or even an economic collapse that dwarfs the impact of the pandemic, deficit hawks fear.

The U.S. federal government does not borrow. Being Monetarily Sovereign, it never can run short of U.S. dollars. It has no need to borrow.

Bernanke quote

Truth from the Chairman

What wrongly is termed “borrowing” actually is the acceptance of deposits into T-security accounts.

The purpose of T-security accounts (“debt”) is not to provide spending money for the U.S. government, the one entity that has infinite dollars.

The primary purposes of T-security accounts are:

  1. to provide a safe parking place for unused dollars, which stabilizes the dollar and
  2. to assist the Fed in setting interest rates.

The federal government could stop accepting deposits into T-security accounts today if it wished. And in the event that people stopped depositing into T-security accounts, the U.S. Federal Reserve has the unlimited ability to make those deposits.

As for a “major spike in interest rates,” the Fed, not depositors, controls interest rates. The rates are exactly what the Fed wants them to be. Only if the Fed wants a “major spike,” will there be one. Otherwise, no major spike.

Greenspan II.png

Truth from another Chairman

As for “severe inflation,” it never is caused by federal debt or by federal deficit spending. In fact, deficit spending can cure inflations.

All inflations are caused by shortages of key goods and/or services, usually food or energy (oil).

Inflations are cured when the government deficit-spends to obtain the scarce goods and/or services and then distributes them to the private sector.

Consider the infamous Zimbabwe hyperinflation. The Zimbabwe government took farmland from farmers and gave it to people who didn’t know how to farm.

The predictable result: A massive food shortage that led to inflation. The Zimbabwe government could have ended the inflation by importing and distributing food (or better, by not stealing the farmland in the first place).

Instead, it merely devalued its currency, again, again, and again.

By contrast, Germany cured its infamous hyperinflation by employing businesses and people to build the greatest war machine the world had ever known. That allowed people and businesses to thrive, and eliminated shortages. (War preparation was not the best use for German money, but it did cure the hyperinflation.)

Others argue that these potential future issues pale in comparison to the very real catastrophe that will happen without a large rescue package.

Research suggests that the $600 weekly bonus added to unemployment has kept the economy from collapsing even further over the past few months.

Now that it’s expired, millions of Americans are at risk of losing their homes and countless businesses could close permanently.

True. The $3 trillion rescue package helped avoid the catastrophe that is certain unless at least $7 trillion is pumped into the private sector.

Oh, that won’t happen? Congress won’t do it?  Then assume we will have an economic catastrophe with massive unemployment, starvation, and more death — all unnecessarily.

The only way to truly save the economy, some argue, is to get the pandemic under control.

Spending money to improve testing, help people stay home and prop up struggling state budgets in the short term could prevent the need for an even bigger stimulus down the road.

Some Democrats believe that concerns about debt are insincere and motivated by politics, since the GOP enthusiastically supported tax cuts in 2017 that are expected to add trillions to the deficit.

Getting the pandemic “under control” is not the only way to save the economy, though it’s a good thing to do.

The faster way is to pump trillions of dollars into the private sector so that businesses can do business and consumers can consume.

And now what you nervously have been waiting to see: More truly ignorant comments by a few of America’s opinion leaders:

The stimulus should be limited to the most essential remedies
“Senate Republicans are right to be worried about rising federal debt. But they are wrong to artificially limit the level of spending in the latest coronavirus relief package.” — Henry Olsen, Washington Post

There are zero reasons to limit the stimulus. Note how Olsen takes both sides of the issue. That way, in retrospect, he always can lay claim to having been right. That is how one gets to be an “expert.”

At a certain point, U.S. credit may run out
“America’s borrowing capacity is large, but we may discover that it is not unlimited.” — Brian Riedel, National Review

The U.S. doesn’t borrow, so it doesn’t need “credit” and doesn’t have a “borrowing capacity. Being Monetarily Sovereign, it has absolute control over the value of its money and its credit, and never can run short.

Spend money now, but aggressively tackle the deficit once the pandemic ends
“When the pandemic passes, authorities need to shift out of rescue mode and start weaning capitalism off easy money and bailouts.” — Ruchir Sharma, Wall Street Journal

Sharma’s formula is to “spend money now ” to feed our starving economy, but when the pandemic ends, begin to starve the economy? Wow! Great idea, Ruchir: Starve future generations.

Better to spend money now, and spend money later, to continue to grow the economy.

The previous stimulus proved you can’t spend your way out of a crisis
“Having wasted the opportunity to cool off the spending binge and put the country in a better position to deal with a crisis, Congress now appears ready to do the only thing it knows how: spend even more.” — Eric Boehm, Reason

Remember that Boehm is a Libertarian for whom any amount of federal spending is too much.

Let me correct Boehm’s comment: “The previous stimulus proved that when the economy is in full starvation mode, insufficient stimulus will help some, but way, way more is needed.”

Way back in April I wrote that at least $7 trillion was needed. But, Congress voted for $3 trillion.

Of course, it wasn’t enough, so we now are in a serious recession. Yet, Boehm wants to cut back on all spending.

Future generations will suffer from reckless spending today
“Long after an effective vaccination has been discovered, the events of 2020 could figure in another disaster: a forced reduction in Medicare and Social Security benefits, as well as unprecedented tax hikes, to deal with massive national debt.” — Chris Reed, San Diego Union-Tribune

Apparently, Reed is clueless about Monetary Sovereignty. The federal government cannot ever run short of dollars.

So why would there have to be “a forced reduction in Medicare and Social Security benefits, as well as unprecedented tax hikes”? There is nothing that could force the federal government to do anything it doesn’t want to do.

And again, taxes do not fund the federal “debt.” The government could pay for Medicare and Social Security, and pay off the entire debt, without collecting a single penny in taxes.

Don’t worry about the deficit
Risk of large deficits pales in comparison to the harm insufficient stimulus will cause
“Deficits do matter in a sense, but not in the apocalyptic, over-the-cliff and straight-to-hell manner Republicans like to invoke when they’re feeling stingy.

‘A high-enough deficit under the right circumstances could theoretically bring about inflation. But inflation is not some mystical, unsolvable force.

The government has all kinds of tools at its disposal to deal with inflation.” — Zach Carter, HuffPost

Close, Zach, but no cigar. Deficits do matter because they are absolutely necessary for economic growth. A growing economy requires a growing supply of money, and deficits increase the supply of money.

But you are correct when you wrote this: “The government has all kinds of tools at its disposal to deal with inflation.”

More accurately, the federal government has absolute control over inflation.

Republican concerns about debt are purely political
“If there’s one thing we’ve learned over the past decade, it is that there are no Republican deficit hawks — only poseurs who claim to care about deficits in order to block spending they don’t like.” — New York Times columnist Paul Krugman

Right you are, Paul. Now if only you could unequivocally state: “The Federal Government is Monetarily Sovereign. It never can run short of dollars. No one should worry about deficits or “debt.”

Just do it, Paul.

A large rescue package can jump-start the economy’s recovery
“Congress should use this opportunity to support the American people and the American economy. If we get the economy growing, we will be able to pay off the debt.” — Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank president Neel Kashkari to “Face the Nation”

Neel, you’re a Fed bank president, so you, of all people, should know that getting the economy “going” has absolutely nothing to do with the government’s ability to pay off the debt.

C’mon, man.

It’s better to overspend now and avoid a collapse
“We should be trying different things: stimulus payments, unemployment benefits, aid to state and local governments, aid to small businesses. Some of these things will be more effective than others, but it’s much better to err on the side of excess.” — Economist Gus Faucher to the Washington Post

Of all the “expert” comments, the comment by Gus Faucher comes closest to the truth.

My only quibble is with his use of the word, “excess.” We are so far from “excess” (whatever “excess” success may be), that even to mention it is misleading.

Historically low interest rates make borrowing money a smart strategy
“Interest rates on federal debt are currently lower than the expected rate of inflation, so there’s no good reason for restraint in the total size of the package.” — Vox correspondent Matthew Yglesias

Oh, Matthew, you know full well that interest rates are set by the government. The government has the unlimited power to pay as much or as little interest as it wishes.

You are correct that “there’s no good reason for restraint in the total size of the package,” but not because of interest rates. It’s because there never is a good reason to restrain federal deficit spending. Never.

So there it is folks, all those experts giving you contradictory advice, and not one of them demonstrates any understanding of federal financing.

Latest on the Spread of the Coronavirus Around the World | World ...

Foodbank line. Broke in America.

Feel free to contact them, tell them to learn Monetary Sovereignty, and say I said so.

Meanwhile, be ready for more poverty, starvation, homelessness, sickness, and death, thanks to Congress, the President, and the people who preach The Big Lie.

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell

Monetary Sovereignty Twitter: @rodgermitchell Search #monetarysovereignty Facebook: Rodger Malcolm Mitchell …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

THE SOLE PURPOSE OF GOVERNMENT IS TO IMPROVE AND PROTECT THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE.

The most important problems in economics involve:

  1. Monetary Sovereignty describes money creation and destruction.
  2. Gap Psychology describes the common desire to distance oneself from those “below” in any socio-economic ranking, and to come nearer those “above.” The socio-economic distance is referred to as “The Gap.”

Wide Gaps negatively affect poverty, health and longevity, education, housing, law and crime, war, leadership, ownership, bigotry, supply and demand, taxation, GDP, international relations, scientific advancement, the environment, human motivation and well-being, and virtually every other issue in economics. Implementation of Monetary Sovereignty and The Ten Steps To Prosperity can grow the economy and narrow the Gaps:

Ten Steps To Prosperity:

1. Eliminate FICA

2. Federally funded Medicare — parts A, B & D, plus long-term care — for everyone

3. Social Security for all or a reverse income tax

4. Free education (including post-grad) for everyone

5. Salary for attending school

6. Eliminate federal taxes on business

7. Increase the standard income tax deduction, annually. 

8. Tax the very rich (the “.1%”) more, with higher progressive tax rates on all forms of income.

9. Federal ownership of all banks

10.Increase federal spending on the myriad initiatives that benefit America’s 99.9% 

The Ten Steps will grow the economy and narrow the income/wealth/power Gap between the rich and the rest.

MONETARY SOVEREIGNTY

How we can prevent recessions and depressions Saturday, May 25 2019 

How we can prevent recessions and depressions.

In order to prevent something, it is helpful to know what causes that thing. If we wish to prevent recessions and depressions, we need to know what causes them. Then, if we can prevent the causes, we can prevent the effect.

The word “recession” is defined as two consecutive quarters of reduced economic growth. It’s an arbitrary definition, that could just as easily be “three or more” – or fewer – quarters of reduced growth.

“Depression” has an even less specific definition. Investopedia says, “A depression is a severe and prolonged downturn in economic activity. In economics, a depression is commonly defined as an extreme recession that lasts two or more years.”

Ask any mainstream economist what causes recessions and depressions, and he’ll tell you pretty much what 24/7 Wall Street says in its 2010 article, “The 13 Worst Recessions, Depressions, and Panics In American History”  by Michael B. Sauter, Douglas A. McIntyre, and Charles B. Stockdale.

They list as causes:

” . . . sharp rises in unemployment, disruption of the banking and financial system, steep fall-offs in business and consumer spending, stagflation, rising bankruptcies, and an increase in the number of companies which have to weather periods of financial distress, asset speculation bubbles (rapidly rising values of gold, land, real estate), trade restrictions, bank failures, unchecked lending,” and just about anything else you can imagine.

Thus, to the mainstream economists, preventing recessions and depressions merely requires preventing all of the above — in short, they have no idea what to do.

There is, however, one common denominator for the vast majority of recessions and for virtually all depressions, and if we prevent that one common denominator, we will prevent recessions and depressions.

Here is some data that illustrates the common denominator: Image result for shoveling money

1796-1799: U.S. Federal Debt reduced 6%. Depression began 1797
1804-1812: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 48%. Depression began 1807.
1817-1821: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 29%. Depression began 1819.
1823-1836: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 99%. Depression began 1837.
1852-1857: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 59%. Depression began 1857.
1867-1873: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 27%. Depression began 1873.
1880-1893: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 57%. Depression began 1893.
1920-1930: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 36%. Depression began 1929.

Historical Debt Outstanding 

1796-1799: U.S. Federal Debt reduced 6%. Depression began 1797.
01/01/1799 78,408,669.77
01/01/1798 79,228,529.12
01/01/1797 82,064,479.33
01/01/1796 83,762,172.07

1804-1812: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 48%. Depression began 1807.
01/01/1812 45,209,737.90
01/01/1811 48,005,587.76
01/01/1810 53,173,217.52
01/01/1809 57,023,192.09
01/01/1808 65,196,317.97
01/01/1807 69,218,398.64
01/01/1806 75,723,270.66
01/01/1805 82,312,150.50
01/01/1804 86,427,120.88

1817-1821: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 29%. Depression began 1819.
01/01/1822 93,546,676.98
01/01/1821 89,987,427.66
01/01/1820 91,015,566.15
01/01/1819 95,529,648.28
01/01/1818 103,466,633.83
01/01/1817 123,491,965.16
01/01/1816 127,334,933.74

1823-1836: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 99%. Depression began 1837.
01/01/1836 37,513.05
01/01/1835 33,733.05
01/01/1834 4,760,082.08
01/01/1833 7,001,698.83
01/01/1832 24,322,235.18
01/01/1831 39,123,191.68
01/01/1830 48,565,406.50
01/01/1829 58,421,413.67
01/01/1828 67,475,043.87
01/01/1827 73,987,357.20
01/01/1826 81,054,059.99
01/01/1825 83,788,432.71
01/01/1824 90,269,777.77
01/01/1823 90,875,877.28

1852-1857: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 59%. Depression began 1857.
07/01/1858 44,911,881.03
07/01/1857 28,699,831.85
07/01/1856 31,972,537.90
07/01/1855 35,586,956.56
07/01/1854 42,242,222.42
07/01/1853 59,803,117.701

1867-1873: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 27%. Depression began 1873.
07/01/1873 2,234,482,993.20
07/01/1872 2,253,251,328.78
07/01/1871 2,353,211,332.32
07/01/1870 2,480,672,427.81
07/01/1869 2,588,452,213.94
07/01/1868 2,611,687,851.19

1880-1893: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 57%. Depression began 1893.
07/01/1893 1,545,985,686.13
07/01/1892 1,588,464,144.63
07/01/1891 1,545,996,591.61
07/01/1890 1,552,140,204.73
07/01/1889 1,619,052,922.23
07/01/1888 1,692,858,984.58
07/01/1887 1,657,602,592.63
07/01/1886 1,775,063,013.78
07/01/1885 1,863,964,873.14
07/01/1884 1,830,528,923.57
07/01/1883 1,884,171,728.07
07/01/1882 1,918,312,994.03
07/01/1881 2,069,013,569.58
07/01/1880 2,120,415,370.63

1920-1930: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 36%. Depression began 1929.
06/30/1930 16,185,309,831.43
06/29/1929 16,931,088,484.10
06/30/1928 17,604,293,201.43
06/30/1927 18,511,906,931.85
06/30/1926 19,643,216,315.19
06/30/1925 20,516,193,887.90
06/30/1924 21,250,812,989.49
06/30/1923 22,349,707,365.36
06/30/1922 22,963,381,708.31
06/30/1921 23,977,450,552.54
07/01/1920 25,952,456,406.16

It’s pretty clear isn’t it. The common denominator among all U.S. depressions is reduced federal deficit spending (reduced debt). A growing economy requires a growing supply of money, and federal deficit spending provides that money.

Ask anyone what caused the “Great Depression of 1929, and they will tell you exactly the same thing as Messrs. Sauter, McIntyre, and Stockdale:

“A period of rampant speculation in the 20’s led to a market crash of epic proportions. Over the course of two days, beginning with the infamous ‘Black Tuesday,’ the stock market lost more than a quarter of its value.”

Utter nonsense: The stock market IS rampant speculation. That’s all it is and all it ever has been. That’s its purpose. What do you think those guys behind computers, and those other guys on the floor waving their arms and screaming are doing: Rampantly speculating.

No, the Great Recession was due to lack of money.

And here is another hint:

Federal debt growth

Recessions (vertical gray bars) tend to begin following a period of reduced federal debt growth, and recessions and depressions are cured by increased federal debt growth.

Reduced growth in the money supply does tend to cause the ” . . . sharp rises in unemployment, disruption of the banking and financial system, steep fall-offs in business and consumer spending, stagflation, rising bankruptcies, and an increase in the number of companies which have to weather periods of financial distress, etc., etc. mentioned above, but they all are results, not the fundamental cause.

Economic growth requires money growth, which should be obvious, because the primary measure of the economy is GDP, which is a money measure. 

GDP = Federal Spending + Non-federal Spending + Net Exports.

All three terms — Federal Spending, Non-federal Spending, and Net Exports — are associated with increased supplies of money.

Since the federal government cannot run short of its own sovereign currency, the U.S. dollar, and has the unlimited ability to prevent inflation (which, in any event, is not caused by federal deficit spending, but rather by shortages), what is the reason to reduce federal deficits and debt?

I can think of only one: Ignorance of facts.

The one good thing Donald Trump has done (though he is clueless about what it is) is to run a trillion-dollar deficit. That will grow the economy, further, just as Barack Obama’s deficits did.

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell
Monetary Sovereignty
Twitter: @rodgermitchell
Search #monetarysovereigntyFacebook: Rodger Malcolm Mitchell

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The most important problems in economics involve the excessive income/wealth/power Gaps between the richer and the poorer.

Wide Gaps negatively affect poverty, health and longevity, education, housing, law and crime, war, leadership, ownership, bigotry, supply and demand, taxation, GDP, international relations, scientific advancement, the environment, human motivation and well-being, and virtually every other issue in economics.

Implementation of The Ten Steps To Prosperity can narrow the Gaps:

Ten Steps To Prosperity:

1. Eliminate FICA

2. Federally funded Medicare — parts a, b & d, plus long-term care — for everyone

3. Provide a monthly economic bonus to every man, woman and child in America (similar to social security for all)

4. Free education (including post-grad) for everyone

5. Salary for attending school

6. Eliminate federal taxes on business

7. Increase the standard income tax deduction, annually. 

8. Tax the very rich (the “.1%”) more, with higher progressive tax rates on all forms of income.

9. Federal ownership of all banks

10. Increase federal spending on the myriad initiatives that benefit America’s 99.9% 

The Ten Steps will grow the economy, and narrow the income/wealth/power Gap between the rich and you.

MONETARY SOVEREIGNTY

 

Why do they want to make you angry at the wrong thing? Tuesday, Apr 16 2019 

I’ll tell you who “they” are and what the “wrong thing” is. But allow me to lead off with some excerpts from the anti-government site, Reason.com.

Fundamentally, Reason.com believes all governments are too large, no matter how large or small they may be.

Of course, making a government smaller does not make it more efficient, more benevolent, or wiser. 

Government is an easy target, because as you repeatedly have been told, government is terrible, except for one little thing: In a world without government, we would be starving, non-human, savage, undisciplined animals. 

Recently, Reason.com published an article titled, GOVERNMENT WASTE, Happy Tax Day! Here Are 6 Infuriating Ways the Government Spends Your Money
Surprised? Yeah, neither are we. By, JOE SETYON | 4.15.2019

The article refers to the federal government (important point). Excerpts:

Happy April 15, everyone! The federal government collects about $3.5 trillion in tax revenue each year, according to the White House Office of Budget and Management. Here, in no particular order, are six of the more infuriating ways that money has gone to waste.

1. $300,000 on 391 coffee mugs
2. $400,000 to promote asset forfeiture…in Paraguay.
3. $13.6 million to hire two border agents
4. More than $325,000 for Mike Pence’s national anthem stunt
5. $333,000 to study bars on the U.S.-Mexico border
6. Nearly $3 million to study dance clubs

If you’re curious, you can click the above link to read the details about each expenditure, but the point is that the federal government spent millions, billions and even trillions on lots of stuff that seems really dumb, and the writer wants you to be angry that these “useless” expenditures are taking dollars from your taxpayer pockets.

And it’s all a lie.

Those payments for coffee mugs, Paraguay, border agents, Pence, bars, and dance clubs didn’t cost you one cent. In fact, those payments put dollars into your pockets.

All federal “wasted” spending puts dollars into your pockets.

Now, if the article had been talking about state government or local government waste, it would have been correct. State and local taxpayers do pay for state and local government spending.

That is because state and local governments are monetarily non-sovereign. (So are you and I).Image result for government money

Those state/local governments do not have the unlimited ability to create their own sovereign currency; they have no sovereign currency; they use the U.S. dollar.

They can, and often do, run short of dollars, and they need tax dollars in order to survive.

By contrast, the federal government is Monetarily Sovereign. It has the unlimited ability to create its own sovereign currency, the U.S. dollar.

The federal government never unintentionally can run short of dollars. Even if all tax collections — income taxes, FICA taxes, luxury taxes, etc. — totaled $0, the federal government could continue spending, forever.

Every time the federal government pays a creditor, it creates new dollars, ad hoc.,

So what about all that “wasted” federal spending? Those are dollars that the federal government created from thin air, and added to the economy.

The “dance club” millions, the coffee mug thousand, the millions for two border agents — all those dollars were created from thin air and were added to the U.S. economy (except for a few that may have gone to overseas suppliers).

The vast majority of those dollars went to U.S. businesses, who used those dollars to pay for employees, who in turn used the dollars to purchase things like food, housing, clothing, cars, education, etc.

In short, the federal government’s “wasted” dollars actually are stimulus dollars, that grow the economy, and eventually wind up in your pockets, my pockets, your kids’ pockets, and even Donald Trump’s pockets.

Again, this is not true of state and local government waste. They do not create dollars from thin air. They use existing tax dollars for their spending. So when they waste money, the dollars come from their taxpayers’ pockets.

Image result for bernanke and greenspan

It’s our little secret. Don’t tell the people we don’t use their tax dollars.

Ben Bernanke: “The U.S. government has a technology, called a printing press (or, today, its electronic equivalent), that allows it to produce as many U.S. dollars as it wishes at essentially no cost.”

Alan Greenspan: “Central banks can issue currency, a non-interest-bearing claim on the government, effectively without limit. A government cannot become insolvent with respect to obligations in its own currency.”

St. Louis Federal Reserve: “As the sole manufacturer of dollars, whose debt is denominated in dollars, the U.S. government can never become insolvent, i.e.,unable to pay its bills. In this sense, the government is not dependent on credit markets to remain operational.

So, if the government neither needs nor uses tax dollars, why does it collect taxes? I’m glad you asked. There are three reasons: One mostly good, one bad, and one horrible.

The mostly good reason is: To control the economy by levying taxes on things they wish to reduce, and by giving tax breaks to things they wish to encourage. So-called “sin” taxes are examples of the former, and home real estate tax deductions are examples of the latter.

The bad reason is to reward rich political donors by giving them special tax breaks not available to the middle and lower classes.

The horrible reason is to groom you, the public, to believe that federal spending for social benefits (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, other poverty aids, college tuition aids, etc.) must be limited or taxes must be increased.

Since the people do not want increased taxes, they easily are convinced that social benefits must be reduced. 

Thus, we have the fake claim that the Social Security Trust Fund is running short of dollars. (Like the federal government itself, no federal agency can run short of U.S. dollars, unless Congress and the President want it to run short). The “Trust Fund” is an accounting fiction, designed to give an imprimatur to a false assertion.

And we have the fake claim that “Medicare for All is unaffordable. And we have all the other fake claims about federal spending being unaffordable, and federal deficits costing taxpayers money. All untrue.

The bottom line is, the rich are rich because they have more money and property than you do. The key word is, “more” because “rich” is a comparative word.

That is, if you have a million dollars, and everyone else has a million dollars, you are not rich. You are just the same as everyone else. But, if you have one hundred dollars and everyone else has just one dollar, you are very rich, indeed.

In short, to be richer, you either must obtain more money for yourself, or you must arrange for the other people to have less money.

Either way widens the Gap between you and those below you, and it is the Gap that makes you rich.

That is why the rich bribe:

  • The politicians via campaign contributions and promises of lucrative employment later
  • The media via advertising dollars and ownership
  • The economics professors via university contributions and jobs with think tanks

The primary purpose of these bribes is to induce legislation to widen the Gap and to make you accept the necessity of widening.

In Summary:

The rich control American politics. Their fundamental goal in life is personal enrichment, which requires widening the Gap between the rich and the rest.

This involves not only bribing the politicians to make Gap-widening legal changes, but also bribing the media and economists to convince you, the public, that Gap-widening is necessary and beneficial.

These information sources promulgate the “Big Lie” that federal finances are similar to your finances, and federal taxes are necessary to fund federal spending.

The rich fear that if you knew federal taxes are not necessary to fund spending, you would demand more benefits, thereby narrowing the Gap, and effectively making the rich less rich.

The rich want you to be angry at “unnecessary” federal spending, so you readily will agree to cut your social benefits.

Finally, the rich want you to believe that federal deficit and debt lead to hyperinflations, similar to those in Zimbabwe and Weimar Germany, though inflations actually are caused by shortages, usually shortages of food and/or energy, not by money creation.

(Despite a 50,000% increase in federal money creation over the past 80 years, average inflation has been moderate, within the Fed’s target range.

While federal debt (blue line) has risen dramatically, inflation (red line) has risen moderately and within the Fed’s target rate

Unfortunately, the constant drip, drip, drip of anti-deficit, anti-debt propaganda continues to brainwash the public, and the Gap widens.

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell
Monetary Sovereignty
Twitter: @rodgermitchell
Search #monetarysovereigntyFacebook: Rodger Malcolm Mitchell

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

The most important problems in economics involve the excessive income/wealth/power Gaps between the richer and the poorer.

Wide Gaps negatively affect poverty, health and longevity, education, housing, law and crime, war, leadership, ownership, bigotry, supply and demand, taxation, GDP, international relations, scientific advancement, the environment, human motivation and well-being, and virtually every other issue in economics.

Implementation of The Ten Steps To Prosperity can narrow the Gaps:

Ten Steps To Prosperity:

1. Eliminate FICA

2. Federally funded medicare — parts a, b & d, plus long-term care — for everyone

3. Provide a monthly economic bonus to every man, woman and child in America (similar to social security for all)

4. Free education (including post-grad) for everyone

5. Salary for attending school

6. Eliminate federal taxes on business

7. Increase the standard income tax deduction, annually. 

8. Tax the very rich (the “.1%) more, with higher progressive tax rates on all forms of income.

9. Federal ownership of all banks

10. Increase federal spending on the myriad initiatives that benefit America’s 99.9% 

The Ten Steps will grow the economy, and narrow the income/wealth/power Gap between the rich and you.

MONETARY SOVEREIGNTY

Translating a letter from a debt nut Monday, Mar 11 2019 

Herewith, for your education and amusement, we translate into correct economics,  the opinions of a certifiable, wrong-headed debt nut:
The following is a statement from Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget:

President Trump’s budget aims to reverse an unsustainable fiscal situation and put debt on a downward path relative to the economy.
Unfortunately, as in previous years, he relies on far too many accounting gimmicks and fantasy assumptions and puts forward far too few actual solutions.
Translation: The Republican budget that President Trump has not, and cannot, read aims to continue a sustainable (since 1940) fiscal situation and put deposits into T-security accounts on an upward path.
Unfortunately, as in previous years, he relies on far too many accounting gimmicks and fantasy assumptions and puts forward far too few actual solutions.
Even full of accounting gimmicks meant to paper over deficits, the President’s Budget would still borrow $7.8 trillion over the next decade.
Under reasonable economic assumptions, however, we find it would be closer to $10.5 trillion.
Translation: Even full of accounting gimmicks meant to paper over stimulative additions to the economy, the Republican Budget that Trump hasn’t read, would still accept $7.8 trillion in T-security account deposits over the next decade.
Under reasonable economic assumptions, however, we find it would be closer to a $10.5 trillion addition to the economy.
Image result for signing blind

How Trump signs GOP bills.

President Trump has already signed into law debt-financed tax cuts and spending increases that will add $2.3 trillion to the debt over the next decade, despite budgets that proposed revenue-neutral tax reform and spending reductions.
This budget does nothing to address or pay for these expanded deficits – in fact, it assumes the tax cuts are extended without even recognizing the cost.

Translation: President Trump has blindly signed into law tax cuts and spending increases that will add $2.3 trillion to the economy over the next decade, despite recessionary budgets that proposed disastrous tax increases and spending reductions.

This budget does nothing to take advantage of the government’s unlimited ability to pay for these expanded additions to the economy – in fact, it assumes the tax cuts are extended without even recognizing the benefits.
Perhaps most disappointing is the decision to continue
Image result for money pouring into a hand

Deficits –federal tax cuts and spending — add growth dollars to the economy.

And expand recent defense increases by funding almost $100 billion in new spending through an off-book emergency war account.

This Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) gimmick is not new, but the proposed abuse of this account rises to a new level never before seen and sets a dangerous precedent.
Translation: Perhaps most encouraging is the decision to continue and expand recent defense increases by funding almost $100 billion in new spending.
This Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) program is not new, but the proposed use of this account rises to a new level never before seen and sets a favorable precedent for stimulating the economy.
Meanwhile, a fantasy assumption of sustained 3 percent economic growth makes a return appearance in the budget.
Every independent forecaster foresees growth to average closer to 2 percent over the next decade.
Assuming an extra point of growth serves no purpose but to mask the high deficits and debt likely to materialize under the President’s budget.
Meanwhile, a typically Trumpist fantasy assumption of sustained 3 percent economic growth makes a return appearance in the budget.
Every independent forecaster foresees growth to average closer to 2 percent over the next decade.
Assuming an extra point of growth serves no purpose but to mask the economy’s surpluses and the deposits into T-security accounts likely to materialize under the Republican’s budget.
Thoughtful Medicare, disability, and other proposals in the budget deserve serious debate, but these policies are overshadowed by inflated economic growth, unrealistic policy assumptions, and a failure to recognize the deep hole that policymakers have dug in recent years.
Translation: Thoughtful Medicare, disability, and other proposals in the budget deserve serious debate, but these policies are overshadowed by inflated economic growth, unrealistic policy assumptions, and a failure to recognize the economic stimuli that policymakers have invested in recent years.
If the past two years are any indication, this budget will be followed by more debt, not debt reduction.
On our current course, Americans will soon face record levels of debt, leading to slower income growth, increased interest payments, and less opportunity.
If the past two years are any indication, this budget will be followed by more economic growth, not growth reduction.
On our current course, Americans will soon face record levels of economic growth, leading to higher income growth, increased interest payments into the private sector, and more opportunity that results from increases in the money supply. 
In Summary:
If you merely substitute:
  • “deposits into T-security accounts”  for “debt,”
  • “investments in the private sector” for “deficits,”
  • “sustainable since 1940” for “unsustainable,”
  • “favorable precedent” for “unfavorable precedent,” and
  • “Republican” for “Trump” (who never reads anything and will sign anything anti-Obama),
you will be able to glean the truths from the lies of Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell
Monetary Sovereignty
Twitter: @rodgermitchell
Search #monetarysovereigntyFacebook: Rodger Malcolm Mitchell

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

The most important problems in economics involve the excessive income/wealth/power Gaps between the richer and the poorer.

Wide Gaps negatively affect poverty, health and longevity, education, housing, law and crime, war, leadership, ownership, bigotry, supply and demand, taxation, GDP, international relations, scientific advancement, the environment, human motivation and well-being, and virtually every other issue in economics.

Implementation of The Ten Steps To Prosperity can narrow the Gaps:

Ten Steps To Prosperity:

1. Eliminate FICA

2. Federally funded medicare — parts a, b & d, plus long-term care — for everyone

3. Provide a monthly economic bonus to every man, woman and child in America (similar to social security for all)

4. Free education (including post-grad) for everyone

5. Salary for attending school

6. Eliminate federal taxes on business

7. Increase the standard income tax deduction, annually. 

8. Tax the very rich (the “.1%) more, with higher progressive tax rates on all forms of income.

9. Federal ownership of all banks

10. Increase federal spending on the myriad initiatives that benefit America’s 99.9% 

The Ten Steps will grow the economy, and narrow the income/wealth/power Gap between the rich and you.

MONETARY SOVEREIGNTY

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